How to Canonically solve the problem of 2 Popes

REPRINT OF SEPT. 30, 2021 A. D.

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

Catholics have been lulled into accepting the revolution, which drove Benedict XVI from power and installed the globalist pseudo-savant from Argentina in the Vatican, by many specious arguments.

Chief of which is that promoted by Cardinal Raymond Burke, that, namely, there is no canonical procedure to address an invalid or contested papal resignation.

However, thanks to the genius of Pope Benedict XVI, a canonical way to restore him to the Apostolic Governance of the Church of Rome is available.  And it is provided for in the 1983 Code of Canon Law promulgated by his predecessor, John Paul II, which he himself, when still a Cardinal of the Roman Church, advised upon.

This solution enshrines the example of the Synod of Sutri (See here, here, here and here), which in 1046 met at Sutri, in the Metropolitan Province of Rome to discern which of the three papal claimants was legitimate or not. It found that none were, and deposed all three.

As Andrea Cionci has established with the input of the leading canonical scholars who are collaborating with him, Pope Benedict XVI did what he did on Feb. 11, 2013 to give notice to the whole Church that the Apostolic See was impeded by a conspiracy of Cardinals who were preventing him from governing the Church of Rome and the universal Church, as Christ’s Vicar on Earth.

This conspiracy to obstruct his apostolic mission was impeding the Apostolic See. And in the case of an impeded see there are specific canons which govern what can be done and what is to be done.

Now in the case of an impeded see which is subsequently usurped by an invalid un-canonical election, there does exist in the Code of Canon Law a solution and a remedy, contrary to what Cardinal Burke has publicly declared.

Let’s examine it closely.

First, the dispute as to whether or not Pope Benedict XVI’s renunciation of ministry effects his loss of munus cannot be resolved by private judgment or opinion. The solution must be based on canonical norms and principles, read authentically according to the mind of the Church as expressed in Canon 17.

That canonical argument has been made already.

But the argument is distinct from the canonical judgement which would canonically oblige all Bishops everywhere to accept Benedict and not Bergoglio the Pope.

Here we are face to face with two realities. The truth, and the judgement of the truth in a forensic forum.  A judge does not make a man a murderer, but a murderer when apprehended and judged as such, is publicly known in a forensic manner to be a murderer.

A forensic judgement does not make a thing true or false, but it does proclaim in an authoritative manner what that truth or falsity is.

This is why, in addition to there being only one sound canonical determination of the truth that Benedict XVI is the pope, there also needs to be a forensic judgment of that.

Such a judgement is under the competence of the Provincial Council of the Roman Ecclesiastical Province.  This province is the territory which comprises the Diocese or Rome and the suburbican Bishoprics which over time were separated from it and which still are included under Apostolic right, inasmuch as they are ruled by Cardinal Bishops who are reckoned members of the Roman Curia.

I speak of the Dioceses of Ostia, Velletri-Segni, Porto-Santa Rufina, Frascati, Palestrina, Albano, and Sabina-Poggio Mirteto.

The metropolitan see is the Apostolic See, in this case, since it is the chief see in the Roman Province.

A provincial council is described in canons 440-446.  And how Cardinal Burke does not know of this is beyond me.

Canon 440 § 1 specifies that a provincial council can be called anytime there arises a need which the Bishops of the Province deem suitable.  This is an extremely liberal grant of discretion.  Certainly doubt as to whom is the true Pope is sufficient need.

Now in Canon 440 §2, it is said that in a sede vacante in the Metropolitan See, a provincial synod is not to be called, yet in canon 442 §2, it says, that when that See is impeded, the Bishops of the province can elect one of themselves and preside over such a Council.  This implies that a provincial council can be called when the Metropolitan See is impeded. Which is the exact case in law.

Accordingly in accord with canon 442 §2, the elected suffragan can determine the time and place of such a Council and the questions to be discussed, the length of the discussion and whether to move it from one place to another as may seem opportune or necessary. He can also dissolve it or extend its sessions.

Now in accord with Canon 443, §1, all the Bishops, Bishop co-adjutors and auxiliaries must be convoked, if a Provincial Council is called. Also all other Bishops who hold a munus in the province. Bishops emeriti can also be called, as well as all other Bishops incardinated in the Province. This includes all the Bishops and Archbishops incardinated at the Vatican, such as Archbishop Viganò, and all the Cardinals of the Roman Church.

In addition all the major superiors of religious communities in the Province must be invited, as well as all Rectors of Pontifical institutes in the Province, and all Rectors of Major Seminaries. Vicar generals and Episcopal Vicars must also be called.

All these have the right to vote.

In addition, all the clergy and laity of the province can be called, but they do not get but a consultative voice, but no more than half the number of those who must be invited who can vote. In addition two members of each priestly diocesan council of each diocese in the province and of each Cathedral Chapter are to be invited with consultative voice.

Finally, others can also be invited by the presiding Bishop with the consent of the other bishops of the province who are ordinaries.

The power of the Provincial Council of the Roman Province is affirmed in canon 445, which says it can act “to defend common ecclesiastical discipline”, and surely, who is the true Pope is the keystone to all ecclesiastical discipline in the Province.

In the case of two rival popes, I would gather that not only the Bishops and clergy and superiors which an anti-pope appointed but also those which the true pope appointed, even though they were thrust from their sees could attend.  And clearly those appointed by the true Pope do not need permission from those appointed by the Anti-pope.

Thus, with such Council called, a synod like that of Sutri in 1046 can resolve canonically who is the true Metropolitan of the Roman Province and order deposed the one who has not a shred of canonical right to call himself the Pope.

 

6 thoughts on “How to Canonically solve the problem of 2 Popes”

  1. Which brave Cardinal (just one, pretty please) created by Benedict will step forward? Forgive me, but the cowardice of any of the College of (valid Cardinals) puts great doubt in my mind that at least ONE will step forward. What in Sam Hill is their problem? Have they too sold their souls for thirty pieces of silver? 😡

    1. I expect a non voting Cardinal who does not reside at Rome, will be the first to speak, because he has less to risk losing.

  2. In the background methinks I hear the sound of threats, blackmail, and of arms being twisted for Cardinals to remain silent by freemasonic thugs acting on orders of Soros, Claus Swab, and those who pull the strings behind the UN.

  3. This is a canon law question about a another topic related to the present state of the papacy:

    Regarding the deposing of a heretical pope, I read in a comment box some time ago that the code of canon law that was replaced in the early part of the twentieth century ( not the code that was new then but the one that was dropped at that time) contained a provision for deposing a heretical pope. I was told that when a provision such as this one is not repeated in the replacement code, then the old code remains valid for the specific matter in question.
    Is any of this true? Please explain.

    1. Well the question is academic, since there is no canonical evidence that Bergoglio is the pope, because to be elected pope you are elected to receive the petrine munus. This is expressly in the Papal Law on conclaves. But B16 never renounced that. So Bergoglio was never a pope. As for putting a cardinal on trial for heresy, the pope must consent to the action since otherwise Cardinals are immune from prosecution in Church courts.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.