Br. Bugnolo: My warning about the excessive use of Electronic Communications

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

In this video, above, I give my warning to those who use the internet. After listening to my message, watch this video, below as an example, and see how these Catholics are living as God wants and avoiding all of the problems I spoke of:

For they are listening carefully to other human beings, they going out of their homes to meet real human beings, they are gathering together to pray, and they are dedicating themselves to the spiritual and corporal works of mercy in their own communities. These Catholics are neither addicted to nor enslaved by electronic communications. And that is why they are thriving.  — The song they are singing, at this gathering of the Legion of Mary, is in honor to Her work in salvation history.

11 thoughts on “Br. Bugnolo: My warning about the excessive use of Electronic Communications”

  1. Thank you, Br Bugnolo, for this excellent video. I myself have never used social media, yet this is a good reminder to spend more time in reality rather than on a computer.
    How do you think we can help friends and family to disconnect from social media – or even pay attention to a conversation? (Perhaps you could make a follow-up video on this topic.)

  2. Excellent article on a vital topic for our times.

    It hasn’t been very long ago that the cellphone was invented. In 2003, I was living in Oregon and wanted to drive back to Missouri in my old Dodge van. My daughter mailed her cellphone to me so I could call for help if my van broke down.

    Now my phone is the first thing I pick up in the morning, and I carry it with me all day. I tried to do without it by getting a flip phone, which worked for awhile, but I lost all my music and couldn’t look anything up. I still read books, but this phone has wormed its way into my life.

    I try to remember how I got along without it only 20 years ago, and all the years before that, but I can’t.

    I really appreciate your article. In order to deal with a problem, you have to be willing to admit that you have one. I don’t have any other technology, no computer, so my phone serves as telephone, computer, and camera for me.

    I will certainly be thinking about ways to lesson my dependence on this thing, because everything you said makes perfect sense.

    I hope you will do more articles on this subject, but if I manage to get rid of my phone, I won’t be able to follow you, either.

    I wonder if there is some way to throw out the bathwater, without throwing out the baby?

    Thank God I don’t do social media!

  3. Great video. The video covers multiple golden points, each could be made into its own video!
    I have family who are like that lady who reached home at 2! Hard to tolerate them.
    Yet it is not too easy to go out and make friends, you set high standards which rarely someone meets.
    Anyhow if it weren’t for seeking on the internet everyone would have been jabbed, no islands of un-jabbed would have existed.

  4. And yet, because I am an empty-nester-stay at-home-wife…you and AJ have become my best friends!

    All kidding aside, your points are valid. I’m well aware. And I’m guilty of some.

    Oh how I long for those days before cell phone technology. We all functioned just fine.

  5. Electronic communication is, indeed, a two edged sword. Without it, as DelhiAnon points out, it’s unlikely there would be more than a few of us, with medical issues relating to pharmaceuticals, not jabbed today, among other positve outcomes, such as communications from Italy reaching Texas, USA, in a timely manner if at all, or quick communication with friends in far flung locations. On the other side, being so attached to electronics you go nowhere without them, or text the person near you physically, rather than talking to him, is more than a bit nuts. We need a balance there certainly. Even “social media” can be good as a means to share important information with a lot of people quickly, or it can just be a gossip, or bully, platform, which is decidedly wrong. Like any addiction, it can sneak up on you, even though the basic thing has positive uses too. It’s the abuse that’s the problem, as usual, not necessarily the thing itself, and yes, far too many do abuse their electronics.

  6. Excellent advice, brother. I appreciate this information and agree with all that you said. I shall share this with friends.
    God bless you always!

  7. It’s not too often that you see people on the internet advocating less use of technology, lol. But what you say makes a lot of sense, and it agrees with my own personal philosophy of life.

    I have a farm out in Mennonite country, so maybe my neighbors’ way of life has rubbed off some, but I have always been somewhat leery of technology. I’m not a Luddite or anything, and I find some technology pretty useful, like my old Dodge truck, but I don’t see any good coming from sitting on a computer all day or walking around with my face stuck in a cellphone. That could be pretty dangerous on a farm. And I am always amazed at how much my neighbors get accomplished with a minimum of labor-saving devices.

    Thank you for having the guts to speak the truth.

  8. My grandchildren gave me a smartphone. fortunately I am forgetful and often left it on the kitchen counter. The more I saw everyone on the bus or pavement glued to their screens, the less I liked it. So I gave the smartphone to another family member, and got a dumb phone (Nokia) that ONLY calls and texts. Since I only use it for emergencies, it’s not in my hands all the time, I carry a good book with me to read on the bus, and enjoy looking out the windows, unlike the zombies sitting in the rest of the bus. . . . The old desktop enables me to access this blog.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.